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For Darkness Shows the Stars - Diana Peterfreund 3-3.5/5That ending was too neat and too perfect considering what could have happened. There were all those hints of things darker and more sinister things; things that you pick up on even if they’re not completely spelled out. I liked...You know that theirs is a world post something, but you have to piece it all together. Eventually you come away with a picture of people divided among the Luddites who’ve taken it upon themselves to take care of humanity, the Reduced who the former “cares” for and then the Posts (Post Reductionists,) who’re a new kind altogether. But there’s also this slow shift toward something else, toward possibilities that some want and that others fear. I enjoyed connecting the dots; I was intrigued by how vague aspects of it were with things never really being too specific in presentation. Maybe, we know the when, but definitely not the where. Maybe we know the how it is now, but not the why (at least not exactly.) There’s the need to pick through the details and figure out what’s relevant to why they were the way they were. I'm split on...But for all that’s that piecing together, a lot of For Darkness Shows the Stars really is a Jane Austen sci-fi (author’s words, not mine.) Because even with the backdrop of genetic tinkering and being God-sworn to care for others in mind, most of the book is just this girl who read too good to be true. One who knows her place and knows her duties. One who wants things but has resigned herself to her lot. All this would not have bothered me so, had she snapped back at least once or twice; but she simply kept taking and taking (and taking.) Making her seem more the victim, the one that things happened to, instead of the one who made things happen. She’s too sad a figure to be angry at - it would have been like kicking a puppy. Sometimes, I even liked the whole star crossed love that was going on, from her end at least (but not necessarily from his.) More often than not though, it was this same aspect that had me feeling (too) sad for her. Would she forever be the poor little misunderstood rich Luddite girl? All these feeling held true for me, at least initially~ because eventually she reveals a side herself that’s more than the girl regretting her choice; it’s that non-pining version that I enjoyed so much more. I respected the girl who did what she had to, the girl who kept things together. Um... nope..Often though she was just such a sad (sad, sad, sad) figure where he was concerned. Truly, he’s barely in this at all (really, it’s her memories of him that she’s still in love with) but when he was present there’s this unwillingness to bend on his part that all at once made sense but also made their situation only more impossible. I could have been more sympathetic to them, but factor in his rigidity, and his barely there presence…well, I could just feel myself getting angrierYet given all that, I could have rated this a four out of five... except for that end though. My biggest issue with this (as my intro to all this points,) is that last third which felt too much like a hodge-podge mix of everything happening at once… then ending with a resolution that felt too neat, too perfect especially if one considers the dark and sticky things that were raised. Her cousin’s role in it as well as the Reduced/Posts day to day is all remarked upon, but there’s not much in terms of actual confrontation. Things being resolved at a distance took something away from this for me. Perhaps this too neat, too perfect ending fits this Jane Austen-y sci-fi, but I just imagined more. When one is initially consumed by picking through people’s attitudes and a pair of kids’ back-and-forth correspondence, all the while building up this world that’s dark and different but new and trying to go on, I really just thought there’d be more than what I got.It could have been a 4 with that (vague) intriguing world that I just needed to make a complete picture of in my mind BUT that end had me coming up short, as well as that “I’m just a girl standing in front of a boy…” feel through a lot of it. (And let me not fail to point out its cover-fail, too. That is not the Elliot described at all!)