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isamlq

Speak - Laurie Halse Anderson I'm confused. It's well written, her voice sounds authentic, and I even found myself zipping through it in a handful of hours, yet the story itself has left little emotional impact on me. Truth be told, it was the Q and A in the back that elicited more a response. Yes, I was rooting for her, frustrated for her, saddened for/by her... but otherwise, it's the author's response to boys asking what the big deal was that left me speechlessly riled up, which was precisely what I was expecting out of Speak.Melinda Sordino doesn't speak. You see her looking at others and thinking about how things were and how things are now. You can tell even without being told outright that something bad had happened. Fortunately, it doesn't take too long before you put two and two together. And it's sad and upsetting. But still, it's actually every other thought of hers that had me imagining a girl with a tendency to oversimplify. Her teachers don't get her; she doesn't get them. She puts labels on one and all, herself included. I mean Hair Lady and the Neck, Jocks and Marthas?  Other aspects really aren't that simple though, especially when one factors in her parents, who could both get so frustrating! They're there, but not really. Or friends who give credence to the question, 'with friends like those, who needs enemies?' So, her going the route she did, folding into herself made a lot of sense.The Tree as a symbol. I'm of one mind with her school peers that you give meaning to what matters; and her tree was indeed loaded down with so much meaning. First, puny, then gnarly... then growing. It said a lot about where her head was, I suppose. Yet, still one doesn't have to dig down deep to get it.I wish there was more, I really do. It's quick and all, but a lot of it left me wanting more... more of something that I cannot quite put into words.3/5